Feminist & artist. Writing & visuals.

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winter playlist

| On
14.12.15


Birth: opening scene/mini-review

| On
10.12.15

Open, Birth: an hooded, silhouetted figure runs against a white central park backdrop for what is a considerably long tracking shot, accompanied by Alexandre Desplat’s charming Prologue. The jogger – all we presently know to be “a man of science”, later revealed as protagonist Anna’s deceased husband, Sean - then collapses to the floor, made smaller by the eclipsing darkness of the arch.  As the camera moves away from this obstacle in the path, we get the sense of something irretrievably lost, and though the theme of reincarnation presents itself in the quick change of scene and music, it is a tempting leap that the film serves to criticise. Within this first five minutes, the tone of Jonathan Glazer’s Birth (2004) is set: confronting mourning with harsh reality – the contrasting black and white imagery and anonymous characters could easily read as a metaphor for Sean’s conveyed outlook on life.  The willingness Sean has toward believing in “mumbo jumbo” in a situation of mourning is played out by Anna to devastating effect in one of Nicole Kidman’s most impressive performances, and despite the unconventional approach to the subject of grief, it is believable and effective - with cinematography by Harris Savides undoubtedly making it a pleasure to return to.

Layla

| On
3.12.15
Nicole Jones photography feminartist

Nicole Jones photography feminartist

Nicole Jones photography feminartist

Nicole Jones photography feminartist

Model Layla Simons. Photography by Nicole Jones.

polaroids

| On
3.12.15





In order of appearance: Layla, Tamar, Henry & Madie. 







reclaiming the space online exhibition

| On
2.12.15
Pages collage by Nicole Jones feminartist

Recently my work from my Pages project was featured on an online exhibition, Reclaiming the Space. Initially the little A5 book was intended to be a private journal, but soon found the collages filling the pages had very little to do with my own life, and were becoming more and more impersonal as I gathered images from found books, magazines and postcards, rather than including my own memorabilia. The images used span from the 1940s right up to the modern day, and with this in mind I came to think of it as a sort of social commentary, one influenced from a feminist perspective.

The work is tied together under the description "a collection of contemporary art submitted by women and female identifying artists in attempt to claim a space for women's voices in art. The artwork featured in this exhibition directly relates to feminist issues as a whole, but also the experiences of women artists and the space they inhabit in the art world." I'm very proud to have my work featured alongside so many talented women - below are a few of my favourites from the collection.



 


Riley Fields

Love At First Sight: Her Hair, 2015
Mixed Media, The Artist’s Hair, Glue on Wood Panel
12”x12”
&
Love At First Sight: Her Smile, 2015
Mixed Media, Resin Denture Teeth, Glue on Wood Panel
12"x12"



Louise Connor
Pudica I, 2015
Cut paper
 21 x 29.5 cm



Olivia Johnston
Lot’s Daughters (Clara, Emma), 2013
Photograph as inkjet print, 
16" x 20"



Rossana Taormina
Sequenza #5 (the lady), 2011
Mixed Media, Old photographs and thread
11.5 x 17.5 cm




Rachel

| On
25.11.15
Rachel Wobus by Nicole Jones

Rachel Wobus by Nicole Jones



Model Rachel Wobus. Photography Nicole Jones.

Emma

| On
16.11.15
Emma Eccles by Nicole Jones

Emma Eccles by Nicole Jones

Emma Eccles by Nicole Jones

Model Emma Eccles. Photography Nicole Jones.

collage journalling scans

| On
26.10.15
Mindfulness is kind of a buzz-word right now: western individuals seem to be looking once more to Buddhist practices seeking refuge from the relentless stress of modern living. Adults are reaching to their colouring pencils with no shortage of 'colouring for mindfulness' books on the selves, or maybe taking up recommended meditation and yoga. Unfortunately for me, I struggle with even the most basic of asanas (even as a child I could not touch my toes) and the colouring book I bought is far from completion, as any time spent on it is a guild-ridden activity when I almost always have outstanding art deadlines. 'Mindful walking' is one thing I came across that suited me - I've often pretended I'm a cinematographer when observing on walks (I'm not sure if that's sad...I'm a photographer, I do it with everything?)

Anyway, I found that collaging, something I had only touched upon in the past, was something I could do regularly, dedicating a small amount of time to every day and feel productive about. It's not that these other things aren't productive, just that I find collaging especially so; cutting up magazines and books is strangely therapeutic and distracting in that your mind is occupied with the aligning of images and what you can say with them rather than whatever stressful rubbish you've got going on. I feel obliged to say don't rip up books until you have assessed: whether this book was expensive, whether you will want have this book intact at any point in the future, and whether this collage will be making better use of the book's page. 

Here are some of the pages so far in the order they come in the journal.

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal


coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal


coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal

coley jones collage journal



McQueen: Mastering the Unsettled

| On
5.8.15
Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty Feminartist


It's one-thirty am, half an hour until our viewing slot and four hours until McQueen: Savage Beauty will close it's doors and become the UK's most popular paid exhibition of all time. Those leaving the V&A are buzzing (their complimentary Horn of Plenty masks sure to frighten the unsuspecting dog walker) but I cant help but wonder if a weekend planned around a show made a reality by a six-hour bus journey and 24 hours without sleep leaves us susceptible to disappointment.


Fortunately, a failed pilgrimage this was not.

Jurassic World: Summary & Review

| On
29.7.15

Keeping with the usual Jurassic Park unfolding of events, everything in Jurassic World goes to s*** very quickly, however, little is done to ensure we actually care about the outcome. Unlike its predecessors, the film boasts no interesting characters - any 3D is limited to highlighting dinosaur acrobatics, while the remaining cardboard cut outs converse awkwardly.

Hayfever

| On
6.6.15
Nicole Coley Jones photography cornwall
Nicole Coley Jones photography cornwall
Nicole Coley Jones photography cornwall

Model: Kimmy Taylor. Photography: Nicole Jones 

Orly Cogan & her personal mythologies

| On
17.5.15

Orly Cogan is an artist based in New York who works primarily in textiles, using found tablecloths as a canvas. Her intimate, story-like pieces seek to challenge feminine archetypes - drug and cake consumption are some of the unsuspected gems that hide in plain sight within the girlish patterns. Evolving "from the personal mythology of my memories", her use of vintage fabrics extend this mythology back to women in previous generations and give her work a thought-provoking collaborative aspect.

Currently in the stage of moving into a new home and studio, I was able to speak to Orly and ask a couple of questions about what I found to be an interesting characteristic in her works.



I saw your interview at Volta 9 and you said something interesting about "telling a narrative story through the eyes of a child", that they see the world "uninhibited, reliant on the senses"; it reminded me of that quote from Picasso: "it took for four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child". What do you think draws artists to this point of view? 

There’s an immediacy and innocence to a young child’s art making.  There is also a purity of joy and complete lack of self-consciousness.  Children don’t dwell about the outcome and the need for approval hasn't kicked in yet so their artwork is often more about the journey and less about the destination.  It’s that kind of honesty that Picasso was probably referring to.

The "intimacy and vulnerability interchanged with fantasy and fairy tale" you spoke about, would you say that these are attributes of childhood, and do you think these get lost as we age?

Fantasy and reality is mixed for young children. There is a very thin line that separates fairytale from ordinary life and that is a wonderful thing for a child to hold on to for as long as possible. Difficult as it is I think as adults we try to get back to that kind of place through readying, movies and art.  Much of my art has dealt with this dichotomy in portraying the banal domestic realm versus the fairy tale narrative.

Orly Cogan Feminartist
Spin Cycle
Orly Cogan Feminartist

Orly Cogan Feminartist
Wonder of You
You can see more of Orly Cogan's art on her website, orlycogan.com.


Talking to Robyn Nichol

| On
12.5.15

Robyn Nichol Feminartist

Nineteen year old Robyn Nichol is a feminist and artist from West Yorkshire. Featured above is 'The Fear', a piece that resonates with many young women. Nightgowns, however, are just one of the props to feature in her provocative and question raising artworks: femidoms, tampons, pregnancy tests and sex toys being some of the others.

Artist: Alex Skinner

| On
3.5.15
Alex Skinner body hair

Alex Skinner is an artist from London, Ontario and has just finished the advanced diploma in Fine Art at Fanshawe College. In September she will be starting at NSCAD University as an advance standing student and will finish her BFA there. I was immediately drawn to her Hair painting series, in which there is a tactile quality that leaves you thinking you might just be able to brush your hand against the stubble. The elegance of the paintings leaves to viewer to reconsider any preconceptions they may have on body hair, and the absence of a definable subject/gender distances us from our culturally conditioned reactions. Photo-realistic, but not an exercise in self-congratulation, they're good paintings, but they're not just good paintings. A self-professed passionate feminist, her intimate works subtly make us question our relationship with our fuzz. In her own words:

"I spend quite a bit of time looking at social issues surrounding gender. My work often reflects this where I have focused on topics of inequality, rape culture and of course body hair."

Kopano & Fatal Attraktion

| On
3.5.15
Jemma Bradford Kopano  Fatal Attraktion Jemma Bradford

Kopano, or Jemma Bradford is a young performer from Australia who is flying to Sydney in July to star as Sophia her first feature length film, Fatal Attraktion. I've been following Kopano for a while, and have always found myself impressed with her music, so I'm excited to see her branch into acting. Directed by Damiano Dentice, the film's Kickstarter page summarises:

"FATAL ATTRAKTION follows a young woman named Sophia as she deals with the relationships she has with her boyfriend, mother and best friend. In each of these situations conflicts arise about what is to be expected of her as a girlfriend, daughter and best friend. Confronted with these expectations Sophia must find ways to resolve the issue and find her true self."

As if this premise wasn't enough, it is also promised to be a "visual spectacle", with colour coordination, fashion-forward styling and VHS photography. Dentice's vision is one we can trust: an artist, his influences from the internet to late 90s/early 00s aesthetics paint a picture in my mind of a film worth looking forward to. 

Not without the disadvantage of different time zones, I had the chance to speak to Jemma about the film and her role:

Why I'm not entirely convinced on Dove

| On
1.5.15

For the most part, Dove's adverts make me happy. I feel represented when I see women my size in their campaigns, I find growing up less daunting when I see their pro-ageing posters. A few years ago they used a powerful time lapse video to reveal to the public what can be done on Photoshop, and that we should question the depictions of beauty we see around us. This is all great, but it's not doing anything to change the fact we're still valued on our appearance, and beauty is still our goal.

Unilever, the company that owns Dove, along with many others, is run by men. It is also the company that owns Lynx, infamously sexist in their advertising (warning: links offer possible explanation as why so many boys overcompensate with deodorant). Their name is on both the complimentary Dove campaigns and the offensive ones of their male-demographic counterpart; so you can see why I'm ambivalent.